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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

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Oct 13 09 10:41 PM

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These articles are meant to cover different areas than normal guides. These cover different topics in different ways, and are more "food for thought" things to consider rather than references. This thread will be locked so that it will be easier to page through the articles, but there is a discussion thread that can be found here.

Table of Contents
Introduction and Opportunity Cost - 10/13/09 - [link]
Party Roles - 10/16/2009 - [link]
Energy, Adrenaline, and Management - 10/20/2009 - [link]

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

Posts: 1,035

#1 [url]

Oct 14 09 3:13 AM

Introduction and Opportunity Cost
October 13, 2009

Opportunity Cost: The cost of an alternative that must be forgone in order to pursue a certain action. (Source Dictionary.com)

This concept was established by John Stuart Mills, an 18th century English philosopher and political theorist. Since its creation, this idea has been the cornerstone for decision making processes not only in Economics, but all fields that involve decision making. The main implication of this principle is that when making any decision, something must be given up.

Guild Wars is full of decisions, both tactical and strategic. There is no better example than the eight-skill constraint players have when venturing out. The best lesson to learn from Opportunity Cost is that of optimization. When you leave that town or outpost, are you getting the most out of those eight chosen skills? While there is a lot that goes into a stellar skill bar, and even more besides in terms of attributes, equipment, and other factors, whether your bar is the best it can be rather than being good must be asked if you are trying to empower your build.

Due to the scope and complexity of Guild Wars, there are many simple ways to improve your effectiveness. To use another skills example, compare Power Shot and Penetrating Attack (PvE). Power Shot takes longer to recharge, deals less damage, and has no advantages apart from being a core skill, so why use it? For a different example, consider Weapon Sets on a bow-based Ranger. The game allows for quick-swapping of up to four sets of differing weapons, so why not carry different bows for different uses? For a turret build, bringing a Vampiric Hornbow for general use is a good choice, but additionally bringing an Elemental Hornbow for use on enemy Warriors is even better! In terms of Opportunity Cost, you cannot bring a bow for literally every occasion due to the four-slot constraint, however, you are not maximizing your effectiveness without using all of these slots.

These articles will regularly come back to these ideas, and focus on optimization; making the best decision instead of a good decision.

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

Posts: 1,035

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Oct 16 09 4:52 AM

Party Roles
October 16, 2009

This is without a doubt one of the most important topics I can cover. In most areas, you have eight characters with which to customize. The functional core of any build is the skill bar, and for a team of eight, you have sixty-four skills to select. When thinking in terms of team builds, generally the party's strategy trickles down to the character builds rather than the other way around. This means that a strong team build is built around a core strategy decided upon by the team. A team with characters who are not a part of this strategy in order to further its effectiveness does not have a true team build.

There are clearly some constraints on this sixty-four skill setup, such as class limitations, attributes, and equipment. Each character has a limited attribute spread, limited equipment layout, and other characteristics with which to pursue the team's strategy. A good team build will make the most effective use of each team member, rather than having each member fit vaguely into a mold. This is one of the weaknesses of many PvX builds, in that the team is formed from previously constructed individual builds. Many people will know how to play these builds effectively on their own, however, without knowing where exactly your role is in a team, you won't be maximizing your potential.

Depending on the format in which you are playing, your party will have different goals. For PvE and most PvP formats, one victory condition is defeating all opponents. Some PvP formats can feature more defensive play styles, such as some maps in Heroes' Ascent, Hero Battles, and Alliance Battles. This article will focus more on elimination formats, as they are most prevalent.

In order to eliminate an opposing team or group of monsters, you simply need offensive power. To prevent your team from dying, you either need sufficient offensive power to overwhelm the opposing team before you are overwhelmed, or bring defensive power. This is an important distinction, and while defensive power is almost always the best solution, it is important to remember that victory is obtained by winning before you lose. This means the proper balance of offensive and defensive power is that which maximizes offensive power to a minimum defensive power constraint. If you do not have sufficient offensive power to overwhelm your opponents, having more defensive power will not allow you to defeat the enemy team. In the end, your defensive power is directly related to the energy of your healers, which does not deplete as you might expect with additional healers. A common mistake to make is to include too much defense or offense. Both of these make PvE frustrating and near-impossible in Hard Mode, and prevent progress in elimination PvP formats.

Everything in this article thus far has referred to basic, generic offensive or defensive character builds. But what about hybrid or "support" builds? These are the most complex parts of any team build, and serve a somewhat unique role. Consider a Mirror of Ice Water Elementalist build, with Shard Storm, Freezing Gust, and Blurred Vision. Blurred Vision is an excellent skill for shutting down multiple physical opponents, and is a terrific defensive skill. Freezing Gust and Shard Storm serve as valuable snares to shut down incoming frontliners. Mirror of Ice is a terrific offensive skill in terms of spiking potential, but what of the other key skills? Freezing Gust and Shard Storm can also be used to slow the targets of your own team's frontliners in order to make them more effective. Blurred Vision can be used on linebacking frontliners in order to prevent them from causing trouble for your team's frontliners, thus unlocking more of your team's offensive potential. What makes a support bar worthwhile is the ability to play either offensively or defensively depending on the situation. This allows the team to score skills while on the offensive, and stay alive on the defensive.

So now, the next step is to determine the balance of offensive, defensive, and support characters. As I mentioned earlier in the article, the ideal number of purely defensive characters (generally Healing and Protection Monks) is the minimum that the party can function with. For a standard eight-man area, two is generally ideal. For offensive frontliners, two to three is ideal depending on the area. The rest of your team should ideally be support characters, capable of augmenting the team both offensively and defensively. Even an offensive buffer such as an Order of Pain Necromancer can bring Enfeebling Blood, Blood Ritual, and other support as needed.

Bringing the right mix of offense, defense, and support for the job is the most important part of forming a team. It is easy to choose too much of one or the other, or bring poor support. Support players that do not fully understand their role as fluctuating with the battle are not of much use to the team. It is essential for success that a good balance be maintained.

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

Posts: 1,035

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Oct 21 09 2:06 AM

Energy, Adrenaline, and Management
October 20, 2009

Every skill in the game requires some sort of cost. Regardless of activation time, most skills require either Energy or Adrenaline. Energy is somewhat more difficult to manage than Adrenaline, but there are many key things to consider while using Adrenal Skills.

Most professions rely solely upon Energy and Signet skills, notably casters. In battle, you are either attacking, moving, or using a skill. Attacking helps casters little in most situations, so they are limited in their effectiveness to using skills and moving to accomplish their roles. Moving generally aids in the player's role, whatever that may be, but skills must be used to accomplish tasks. Therefore Energy (as well as Adrenaline for some physicals) is the principle fuel for fulfilling a player's role in the party. That means without usable Energy, a player is dead weight in the party. This is very basic, but it introduces the importance of usable Energy as opposed to Energy in general.

Energy Management is a tricky matter, as there are many factors that go into it. A common fallacy of players is to assume Energy Management is synonymous with Energy-Gaining skills, such as those from the Inspiration Magic line. While these can aid Energy Management, there is far more to successful Energy Management. There are several basic components of Energy Management:

  • Efficiency
  • Primary Attributes
  • Energy Alternatives
  • Management Skills
  • Equipment
Not all of these are needed, or even possible for all situations. All of these will be covered later in the Article, but first, it is better to cover some common misconceptions over Energy Management:

Large Energy Pools - A common fallacy is that having a large amount of base energy through Radiant Insignia, Attunement Runes, Energy Storage, and other methods will provide long-lasting Energy returns. Technically, this will allow a player to "hold out" for longer, although a player with good Energy Management will not gain much from having a massive pool. While there will be some benefits, the opportunity cost of bringing such an energy pool (ie Survivor's/Other Insignia, Vitae/Other Runes, etc) is far more useful than the energy gained.

Energy has to last through a Fight - There are several ways to take this, but two common mistakes is to assume that energy can be depleted at the end of a fight, or that all energy should be expended in a fight as soon as possible on offensive characters. Regarding the first of these, this will quickly render you useless in PvP and waste time recuperating in PvE. For the latter, you may cause some initial damage, but will not be able to focus on priority targets. In either case, depleting all of your energy should only be done in absolute emergencies during a fight, or when it is tactically acceptable, such as scoring a key kill in a GvG match.

Glyph of Energy and Inspiration Magic - Many casters feel the need to pack Glyph of Lesser Energy, or feel that they absolutely must have Inspiration spells in order to maintain their energy. As mentioned above, there is far more to Energy Management than skills, and there are far more skills than just these. For GoLE in particular, although it is unlinked, it doesn't save much energy for its long recharge, and the fact that it must be precast should be a turn off. Inspiration may be a useful Attribute Line for many skills (Power Drain in particular), however, each profession has its own skills for Energy Management. Inspiration Magic is indeed powerful, but the Attribute Spread in order to reap its rewards can cripple many builds.

Energy Denial - When many players, Monks in particular, see any form of E-denial, they panic and assume that they have lost due to the rock-paper-scissors nature of the game. Most players will cease to manage their energy, and will assume there is nothing more they can do. Don't panic! There are useful ways using equipment to deal with E-denial that will be covered later on.

Now that some of the do-nots have been covered, it's time to go over the components of good Energy Management I listed previously in the Article.

Efficiency - This applies mostly to Healers, but is still valid for other roles as well. If a party member has 550 of 600 max health, there is no reason to heal that character with a healing spell that heals for 100 health. Similarly, why use an interrupt on a skill that does not need to be interrupted? Save your interrupts for key skills like Word of Healing, Crippling Shot, Diversion, and others. You'll find that using skills only when needed, you will save energy, as well as play better tactically.

Primary Attributes - Each Primary Attribute with the exception of Strength and Fast Casting serves as Energy Management. Most of these are obvious, such as Ranger's Expertise, however, not all of these are as clear. Monk's Divine Favor improves efficiency as does Spawning Power. All of these Attribute Lines also contain several useful management skills.

Energy Alternatives - This is a fancy way of saying Adrenaline skills and Signets. By using skills that don't use energy, you accomplish your role without spending energy. Unfortunately, many of these skills are not as powerful, or cannot fulfill the same roles as energy-based skills. Consider Executioner's Strike and Power Attack. They are nearly identical in effect, however, Power Attack can be used more frequently but at the cost of energy. Balancing these alternative skills with energy-intensive skills is key to making a successful skillbar.

Management Skills - These are either skills that reduce the cost of other skills, or cause the user or his party to gain energy. While most of these skills aren't worth bringing, some like Blood is Power, Power Drain, and Offering of Blood are amazing. As a general rule, the best non-skills are most conditional, as shown by Power Drain's huge energy gain versus its requirement of a spell interrupt. The fewer of these skills (if any are brought) the better, as it is more effective to bring more alternative skills.

Equipment - Here is where things get hectic. Each class has some base energy and energy recovery granted by their armor. Apart from armor bonuses, weapon sets can make a huge difference. While there is no way to improve your energy regeneration, it is possible to net significant gains using energy manipulation. You can keep yourself safe from energy denial, or keep emergency energy. A standard defensive set utilizes a Spear (or other martial weapon) with a "Brawn over Brains" inscription and a Defensive suffix mod, in tandem with a shield. This seemingly results in a net loss of 5 energy, but where does the energy go? If you brought a near identical set without the "Brawn over Brains" inscription, and switched to it mid-battle, you would appear to "gain" that energy back. If you switch back, the energy is once again hidden. I say hidden because while that energy can be accessed by the player at any time, it cannot be touched by opponents. This is how you hide energy from enemy Mesmers, and Rangers with Debilitating Shot. In contrast, you may obtain additional energy reserves by switching to a weapon set with more energy than your current set. A 30e/-2r set will net you 72 energy on a caster including base energy. While you never "sit" on this set except to quickly cast, you only lose a little bit of your energy if you change back immediately to a 4 regen set. Having this additional energy lets you save a teammate if you aggro too many groups, or push in PvP matches to score kills.

Energy Management is one of the most difficult techniques to master in Guild Wars. It is also one of the most important. Once you have control of your energy, you can easily win over your opponents.

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

Posts: 1,035

#4 [url]

Dec 30 09 9:07 AM

Game Mechanics
December 30th, 2009

From this Article forward, the structure and topics covered will additionally work in tandem with NH Training Courses.

On a particular attack, an Assassin deals 10 damage with daggers plus an additional 50 from Unsuspecting Strike. A Warrior deals 30 damage with a Hammer plus an additional 30 from Power Attack. If both characters were under the effects of Flurry, which of the two would deal more damage? The answer is in this article.

Guild Wars is a relatively simple game when compared to other MMO titles popular today. There are still many different mechanics that you need to have at least an elementary understanding of. Knowing the subtle differences between similar mechanics is essential to theorycrafting and effective build creation. For example, consider the difference between the healing and health gain . Many skills affect healing, but few influences exist for health gain. It is one thing to be aware of these differences, and another to research anomalies such as the skills that say "health gain" in the description when the skill actually heals. This type of difference can either make or break a build.

So now that it is clear that there are specific details and mixups throughout Guild Wars mechanics, it is easy to get discouraged. Why spend an hour on a build idea only to have it fail on some technicallity? Fortunately, the Wikis do a terrific job of documenting how the mechanics work as well as listing specific anomalies. You can find a comprehensive list at the following link: http://wiki.guildwars.com/wiki/Category:Game_mechanics
These 84 topics seem overwhelming, but keep in mind most of them do not even affect gameplay! Furthermore, most of what is written in these pages you probably already know. Give these topics a quick glance and you can learn a lot.

Seeing as there is the comprehensive list of mechanics, I will not list specifics here. In answer to the question at the top of the post, the Assassin will deal more damage. This is because Flurry affects base weapon damage only, and not bonus damage. You can see on Flurry's Wiki page that this is well documented, as well as listing linked anomalies such as Illusionary Weaponry damage not being reduced by Flurry. Odds are if there isn't a note or Anomaly tag, it works just like it should according to the game mechanics. If something seems off, check the discussion page!

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

Posts: 1,035

#5 [url]

Jan 3 10 6:01 PM

Damage and the Nuking Myth
January 2nd, 2009

Why have the same Warrior builds been run in competitive PvP for almost five years? The rest of the metagame changes with regularity, so what makes Warriors special? The answer is in this article.

Guild Wars is unique on the MMO scene. It breaks or ignores many traditional features of current and older games. Take the "Holy Trinity" for example, which is the idea that the idea team consists of a Tank, a Nuker, and a Healer. This works in some PvE areas due to absurd builds such as the Permaform Assassin, Terra Tank, 55 Monk, etc. For balanced teams and anything in PvP, this belief does not hold. On the whole, nukers do not have much of a place in Guild Wars. Note that this Article is concerned mostly with the PvP formats.

There are certainly a number of options available for players attempting to effectively nuke. Take Fire Magic for example, since the entire line is devoted to doing large amount of fire damage, typically to several foes. The new Ray of Judgment is widely considered the most powerful of nuking skills due to the burning induced and holy damage, but how effective are these nuking skills in practice? You will have to take my word for this at the moment, but a fair comparison of Nuking damage can be made with a Warrior auto-attacking. Let's set up a very simple scenario and analyze single target damage.

Note - If you do not care how our final conclusion is made and just want to see the results, scroll past the tables and successive text until you come to the second dashed line. It is important for Competitive (see NH Forums) if you understand these distinctions, but it is not essential otherwise.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Let's start with the simplest possible scenario. Good examples of the single-target nuking potential of an Elementalist are Flare and Lightning Strike. We will compare this damage to that of a Warrior auto-attacking the same target. Our first situation makes matters as simple as possible, and is the first column of the below chart. Each boxed table will be covered one at a time, so please don't read ahead!

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First we will look at the top-left box, Flare @ 14 Fire Magic versus a creature with Armor 60 (standard). This is a fair attribute level to assess damage at, and the Armor chosen is a fair baseline. Flare casts in 1 second, has the usual .75 second Aftercast of spells, and has no recharge time. For the given parameters, each Flare will deal 62 damage, and 34 Flares can be cast in one minute. This means that a Flare-spamming Elementalist with 14 Fire Magic will deal about 2108 damage to an AL60 foe assuming all Flares hit and no additional factors are present. Keep in mind this would take over 170 energy per minute.

Next box down, we'll look at Lightning Strike @ 14 Air Magic versus the same AL60 creature as before. For the purposes of giving Elementalists a chance, we will pretend that Lighting Strike has no recharge. Otherwise, the stats of Lighting Strike are similar to Flare, except that it will deal slightly less damage to an AL60 target. The approximate DPM is 2074, slightly less than Flare. As with Flare, this would take over 170 energy per minute.

Next we'll analyze a Warrior attacking with a max-damage Axe with 14 Axe Mastery. As it would be, the weapon is customized and has a +15% damage inscription. For now we will pretend the weapon will never make a critical hit. With these factors, the approximate DPM is a pitiful 1260, only two-thirds as effective as spamming Flare. Let's not count the Warrior out yet, since we have neglected many key factors in a physical's damage output from attacks. Let's slowly add in these additional factors to make for a more realistic representation.

First we'll add in an IAS (skill that increases attack speed). Most frontliners will be in one at almost all times, or at least when they plan on spiking or pressuring. This decreases the attack rate from 1.33 second to .89 second, significantly increasing the damage output. The new DPM adding in Frenzy is 1876, significantly closer to the Elementalist's totals.

Next we'll add in Critical Hits, an important component in physical damage. While physicals auto-crit versus moving targets, we will assume that targets are standing still so the only crits are random. This bolsters the DPM to 2371, greater than the Elementalist.

The tables on the right are for the same circumstances, except that the target's armor has been raised to 80. You can see that the Warrior still does more damage, but the Armor Penetration of Lightning Strike makes it viable for damage. Our original assumption that Lightning Strike has no recharge is incorrect, but skills with high armor-penetration can be effective spike skills as shown by these numbers.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

We are far from a full analysis, but almost all factors not accounted for are in favor of the Warrior, making him the clear winner. Here are some of the factors not mentioned:

  • Bonus damage - The Warrior may use Attack Skills to further increase his damage. Also remember that bonus damage ignores armor, so at higher armors as are common in PvE and competitive PvP the Warrior is even more effective.
  • Weapon Modifiers - A Vampiric or Sundering (use Vampiric) mod causes life steal, which can be treated as damage in terms of pressure and spiking.
  • Physical Buffs - Skills like Order of Pain can increase damage significantly. Asuran Scan is a good example for PvE.
  • Support Skills - Skills like Barbs and Mark of Pain work extremely well, and only function due to physical damage.
These are just some of the benefits of physical damage in skill form. For PvP though, the most important advantage doesn't have anything to do with individual kills. As mentioned in previous Articles, frontliners exist to score kills and occasionally backline. Most meta builds kill mostly by using spikes, which may lead you to think that Elementalists and other nukers can at least cover the "score kills" aspect. This is incorrect, because frontliners have a tool apart from dealing damage to score kills. Frontliners are able to wreak havok by playing unpredictably, and pressuring in a way that midliners cannot. Take the following example: a Warrior with fully charged adrenaline suddenly makes a beeline for your Healing Monk. Either Guardian needs to be cast the Monk, the Warrior needs to be snared or blinded, or one of your frontliners needs to lineback in order to prevent your Monk from dying. Consider that these take energy, a change in positioning, and in general, valuable resources. Depending on the reaction by your team, the opposing Warrior may be able to go and spike another vital target, but you never know until the last possible moment to react. This is why frontliners are so deadly in PvP, they are essential to having good pressure because they waste the resources of the opposing team.

There is one loose end, our analysis covered only single-target nuking skills. In PvP there are popular builds to farm fame in Heroes' Ascent that use DoTAoE (damage over time area of affect), as well as in other formats. These builds work because the majority of the PvP player base, even at the competitive level, relies on solid and easy builds rather than skill. A good "balanced" build in PvP will almost always overcome even a good gimmick because of its utility. For PvE, AoE skills such as Savannah Heat and Searing Flames are commonplace. What you actually get out of these skills is complicated, because you are not always going to be hitting the same number of foes, even with a dedicated tank due to AoE scatter. The armor analysis still applies as shown in the tables earlier, but you can actually win in damage above the frontliners if there are enough foes. Consider Urgoz' Warren, where there are groups of 20+ foes that tend to clump together. In tandem with an AoE snare like Ice Spikes or Grasping Earth on a frontliner, severe damage can be done. Remember AoE scatter though, and that nuking is very unreliable. It may be worth bringing nuking in elite areas, but make sure you are prepared for it with snares and sufficient defense for when the AI loses aggro on your designated tank. In general, nuking is awful even in PvE, so keep that in mind when you would choose to sacrifice utility as an Elementalist for "lots of damage", since you usually lose on that trade.

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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Pony Legionnaire Ariena

AuraLin's Fearless Minion

Posts: 1,035

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Mar 23 11 11:31 PM

Attributes and Attribute Lines
March 23rd, 2011

Why are some attributes considered more useful than others? Why are near-duplicate skills across attributes not comparable? Why do we associate Swords with pressure and Axes with spikes? The answers are in this article.

This topic is a source of confusion for many players in PvP and PvE. The concept of attribute lines is never mentioned in any of the in-game tutorials, and is often assumed to be understood while never having been said. We often refer to attribute lines when we say attribute, which only further adds to the confusion.

An attribute is only the entity you put points into. For primary attributes such as Fast Casting and Strength, players receive profession-relevant benefits in addition to empowering skills. These skills within an attribute make up the attribute line. You can generally associate certain attribute lines with certain features and abilities. For example, the Water Magic line (abbr as Water Magic) specializes in snares and spike assist skills.

You can take this idea even further with weapon-attributes. Swords and Axes deal approximately the same damage per attack (Sword: 18.5 and Axe: 17 at standard normalized parameters excluding crits) but are used differently. Sword damage is relatively stable within 15-22, however, Swords are associated with pressure due to the Swordsmanship attribute line. Pressure comes naturally from Bleeding, Cripple, and various attack skills that synergize with popular secondary profession options such as conjures (used with Sun and Moon Slash). Axes trade pressure for powerful burst damage through skills such as Eviscerate, Executioner's Strike, and Agonizing Chop.

This begs the question of similar, competing attribute lines. Water Elementalists and Rangers are both capable of applying snares, but do so in different manners. Rangers spread reliable cripple quickly, while Water Elementalists utilize more powerful hex-based snares that cannot be used as frequently. Rangers are generally chosen for high-pressure teams, while Water Elementalists are preferred for spike teams. Some "honor balanced" builds utilize both.

Now consider near-duplicate skills across attributes. A popular Curses-bar elite is Soul Bind for pressuring the backline and particularly punishing Ritualist Restoration Flaggers who bring Protective Was Kaolai. Scourge Healing in the Smiting Prayers line is nearly identical but is almost never used because Smiting Prayers as a whole is generally a weak attribute line. In high-level PvP it is sometimes used for Judge's Insight as well as for spike assists, while in PvE it is used for the overpowered Strength of Honor (PvE). Regardless of the format, there are generally better things to take in its place. Necromancers' access to Soul Reaping energy in addition to other energy management skills are better able to use Soul Bind than a Monk is Scourge Healing. Other pairs such as Whirling Axe and Forceful Blow exist so you should be mindful of the advantages and disadvantages of each associated with the respective attribute lines.

Lastly, it is important to remember that having access to a particular attribute line also means the other attributes of the profession are available. Each primary attribute has skills that "tie together" the various attribute lines of the profession, should be kept in mind. Consider Protection Prayers in combination with the Divine Favor elite Spell Breaker in PvE. I frequently refer to Spell Breaker as "my favorite Protection Prayers elite" due to the synergy with prots such as Protective Spirit and Shield of Absorption. When facing PvE mobs, this combination of only three skills turns any player or hero into a nearly-invincible tank. Keeping with Monks, take a look at these assorted Monk Elites that were changed due to their effectiveness on Smiting bars in GvG.

Keep the idea of attribute lines in mind when making builds!

There is more than one right way.
Those who choose their path without walking others walk blind.


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